Read Counting on Grace by Elizabeth Winthrop Online

counting-on-grace

1910. Pownal, Vermont. At 12, Grace and her best friend Arthur must leave school and go to work as a “doffers” on their mothers’ looms in the mill. Grace’s mother is the best worker, fast and powerful, and Grace desperately wants to help her. But she’s left handed and doffing is a right-handed job. Grace’s every mistake costs her mother, and the family. She only feels capa1910. Pownal, Vermont. At 12, Grace and her best friend Arthur must leave school and go to work as a “doffers” on their mothers’ looms in the mill. Grace’s mother is the best worker, fast and powerful, and Grace desperately wants to help her. But she’s left handed and doffing is a right-handed job. Grace’s every mistake costs her mother, and the family. She only feels capable on Sundays, when she and Arthur receive special lessons from their teacher. Together they write a secret letter to the Child Labor Board about underage children working in Pownal. A few weeks later a man with a camera shows up. It is the famous reformer Lewis Hine, undercover, collecting evidence for the Child Labor Board. Grace’s brief acquaintance with Hine and the photos he takes of her are a gift that changes her sense of herself, her future, and her family’s future....

Title : Counting on Grace
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780385746441
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 240 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Counting on Grace Reviews

  • N_maheenayub
    2019-02-23 22:18

    Counting on Grace started off as a slow read, with a description of the mills in Vermont, its machines, and the process of working with "bobbins." There was a good amount of technical jargon that was presented, and readers need to have some background knowledge in order to understand the setting and culture. However, once the reader gets into the story of the strong female protagonist, Grace, and the people who surround her, including her Mamere, Pepe, Miss Lessley, and Arthur, the book becomes one that can't be put down. It's a story of the horrible conditions of the cotton mills in the late 1800s and early 1900s where children as young as 10 worked all day and night, until their feet became unrecognizably swollen. It's where Grace and Arthur were forced to go work even though they both enjoyed going to school. At first, Grace saw the mill as a place where she could earn money to help her family. From the beginning, Arthur despised the job and desperately wanted to return to the classroom.The story continues with Grace growing weary of the mill life. Her body aches and she starts missing reading and writing. Grace and Arthur take extra lessons with the mill's teacher (who is actually against child labor in the mills,) Miss Lessley, on Sundays. It's a story of a true bond between these three characters, who find escape through their miserable lives in the classroom setting. Counting on Grace takes several sad turns, including Arthur deliberately getting his hand stuck in the machine and having to get two of his fingers cut off, Pepe dying which leaves Grace very vulnerable, and Arthur & his mom being forced off the mill by the owners because his mom won't let him suffer as a working boy on the mill anymore. Grace loses several important people in her life, including Miss Lessley who is fired from her job. In the end, the mill remains although there is some hope that enters the story when Mamere (Grace's mom) agrees to let Grace leave the mill and focus on teaching and learning instead.This is an amazing story that takes a hard look at the child labor on the mills in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. With Grace's story, readers empathize with her and Arthur, and get an idea of how difficult and unjust life was for these innocent children who were thrust into rooms with threatening machines. The book ends with a bit of hope as Grace is able to leave the mill and do what she knows she is better at-- learning and teaching. This is a great book to teach intermediate and middle school students about injustice, courage, and friendship.

  • Linda Lou
    2019-03-12 22:24

    Grace was barely 12 when she started at the mill. Her parents used a birth certificate of a two year older sister who died before Grace was born. Grace left school because she wanted to go work in the mill. She did not understand the value of education because her parents did not. It was survival. There was one phrase that her teacher, Miss Lindsey, said to her...she was her second best reader. Grace clung to that and in the end that was what saved her. In those times, the company "owned" you. You worked long hours six days a week, you lived in a company house and paid rent to the company, you bought groceries and clothing from the company store at higher prices and with interest and you were cheated by the company store because you were illiterate. Modern day slavery long after the Cicil War. This is a great book based loosely on a true story of an actual 12 year old Grace. A moving story about life as told by a 12 year old little girl whose self esteem, courage, sense of what is right and what is wrong, social injustices, desire for education and friendship can do to facilitate CHANGE.

  • Karol
    2019-02-24 16:20

    An outstanding book that I picked up in the children's section of my local library. The haunting photo on the book jacket drew my attention, and I just had to read the story.It turns out that the photograph is rather famous; it was taken by Edward Hines and still resides in a museum. He had taken pictures of immigrants arriving at Ellis Island, and became curious about what happened to them after arriving in the U.S. He "followed" them to the towns they settled in and discovered the issues of child labor laws that were not enforced. He used subterfuge to get access to some of the mills, and took photographs of the children who worked there for long hours in terrible conditions. Because of his efforts, social change eventually came.The author's story is the account of fictional characters (other than Mr. Hines, who visits their town and mill). It is well written, from the viewpoint of a young girl who describes what life is like for her and her friends and family. I ached for Grace as she struggled to please her parents and do well in the mill, and ached for her to find the better life that she longer for.

  • Elizabeth
    2019-03-13 22:30

    Being a doffer in the mill is exciting for 12 year-old Grace, until she realizes she has to miss school to do it... and it is not exactly legal. This book really made me think about child labor laws and the evolution of our country. A great read for any age.

  • Mehak
    2019-03-14 00:24

    Overall it was a good book , but I didn’t really enjoy reading it as it isn’t my type of genre that I like to read !

  • Amya Holland
    2019-03-02 22:06

    It was good book overall, Overall showing a kid should factory at such a young age!!!

  • Nitrorockets
    2019-02-23 22:22

    Everyone says that nobody can count on Grace. Her feet move too much and her brain is always thinking about something else, but it’s not true, and she’s going to prove them wrong. When 12 year old Grace is kicked out of school her family is pleased. That means one more person to work at the mill in turn will mean more food to eat and maybe even a pair of shoes for her. At first Grace is glad to be a doffer for her mother at the mill. Her memories of playing in the factory during the summers are still fresh – yet they come to an end as she discovers the draining pain of working 12 hours a day in a stuffy hot factory. Because her mother is a skilled threader Grace has three times the work the average child has, running from frame to frame to keep up production, all the while enduring her mother’s endless criticism. Day after day her mouth and nose fill with cotton and dust making it difficult to breathe, her feet swell from standing so long and her hands get lacerated from the frames. Injury after injury becomes a burden as her six days a week work schedule seems endless. Grace longs to return back to school and dreams of a better life. The question is will she have the courage to stand up to her family and tell them about the dreams in her heart.

  • Maris Digiovanni
    2019-02-19 18:09

    This book provides children with a view of what it would have been like to grow up in the early 1900s in New England. It was a completely different lifestyle then and work came before one’s education. Now, education is viewed as the most important thing and every child is required to attend school. Work now comes secondary to an education. This book really made me realize how lucky I am to live in the time that I do and have all of the things that I have. I have received a good education and had more food than I needed. Many children take these things in their lives for granted and this book shows them how lucky they are. This would be a great book to do a response project on. It would be very interesting to see how different children from different backgrounds respond to this book. This would be a great book to use in the classroom to prepare student for history/research papers or other projects in this area that are about to take place in class.

  • Karin
    2019-03-07 00:22

    As a kid, I loved historical novels and I would easily read a book in a day if it was about "the old days!" Counting on Grace is one of those books -- I couldn't put it down. Grace is a child living in Vermont in the early 1900's. She leaves school at the "old" age of 14 to work in the mills in order to help her family. Money is very tight and every member of the family is needed to make ends meet. The story takes you into the mills and very quickly you realize how hard it was to work in those mills - dirty and noisy with very long days. Grace, however, is a wonderful character and you quickly become her friend. It's a wonderful story about friendship, family and survival.

  • Melissa
    2019-03-15 19:28

    Grace is a young girl who starts working in a cotton mill at the age of 12, which is against the law, but does it to help pay the family bills. The story is a historical fiction story about young children working in cotton mills illegally in the early 1900's. A photographer comes and takes pictures and tries to make a story against child labor laws. I listened to the audio version, and enjoyed the story.

  • Linda Mchugh
    2019-02-24 16:08

    This book is about a Vermont mill girl based on Hine’s Pownal, Vermont portrait of mill children. I liked the book a lot, but then I do tend to like stories of the mill girls. That this was based on the photo of a real person made it seem more authentic to me. It was the story of a 12 year old girl who grew up being forced to work in the mill and quit school.

  • Amy
    2019-03-16 19:22

    Great Book!! Historical fiction at its best, excellent book for tweens - might make them thankful that child labor is no more (at least in USA).

  • Susan Wright
    2019-03-08 23:03

    This book was the 2007 book for Vermont's Community Reading Program. I didn't realize this when I bought the book but since it takes place in Vermont I can understand why. I hope that the readers there were as enthralled by this book as I was. Children think that doing chores around the house is tough. Grace started working in a mill when she wasn't yet a teenager doffing the bobbins for her mother as she turned cotton into thread. The mills were filled with children working under conditions that were dangerous, to say the least. Thank goodness for today's child labor laws in the USA.Ms. Winthrop writes in such a manner that it is easy for young and old to understand. She paints a picture of a life when there was no technology and most children didn't even get an education. An era in our history that fascinates me but one I'm glad not to have lived in.

  • Suzanne
    2019-03-12 17:21

    The year is 1910, and 12 year old Grace lives in a cramped Vermont company house with her family.  She enjoys attending the local school, where she and her friend Arthur are top students.  Now her studies (and her freedom) are threatened when both she and Arthur are told they must work at the mill.In this work of historical fiction geared for middle school readers, Elizabeth Winthrop does an excellent job relating a picture of New England mill life at the turn of the 20th century.  Coupled with the story of real life reformer Lewis Hine, we glimpse the heartbreaking backdrop that became the impetus for social justice in America.I enjoyed this book very much, and was pleased to be able to share it with my daughter.

  • Megan
    2019-03-14 23:22

    Audio. Loved every minute of this YA historical fiction. The only thing that would have improved this book would have been reading it at age 10. I thoroughly enjoyed the author interview at the end of the book. I hope there is a sequel.

  • Kiran Park
    2019-02-20 19:21

    This book was really showing how working in a factory of such a young age, can affect you. Detailing what kids or what kids may have gone through.

  • Rachel
    2019-03-08 20:14

    Very cool historical context, as well as inspiring to young people to pursue education.

  • Lorna
    2019-02-17 22:04

    story about child labor

  • Jessica LeBaron
    2019-03-11 17:24

    Counting on GraceElizabeth WinthropGrace and her friend Arthur stop going to school in order to support their families by working. For work, they “doff” picture frames with their mothers. Grace is a very determined worker and really wants to help her mother, but she has a problem. Grace is left handed, but doffing requires people to work predominately with their right hands. This is a huge issue, because every mistake that is made affects her family negatively. Both Grace and Arthur are underage workers, and they secretly write to the Child Labor Board about the problem of underage workers. Eventually, a man named Lewis Hine shows up from the Child Labor Board to take pictures and to document everything. Thankfully, Lewis Hine ends up changing Grace and her family’s life for the better. The time period of this book is based in the 1910’s, and the author does a good job of making this clear by using differing sentence structures and words than we would use in the present day. For example, there is a line that has the word “doff” in it, as in “his mother needs him to doff her frames.” (Winthrop, 5). I did not know this word, so I had to look it up to figure out what it actually meant. I also like that Grace speaks French at home, even though she speaks English in almost every other context. It shows that even in the early 1900s there was still a lot of settling going on, and there was a lot of different people then just like there are now. Although this book introduced me to a new kind of lifestyle, I don’t feel like it necessarily introduced me to anything big that I haven’t already gone over in a previous class. In contrast to this, though, it gave me insight into one individual’s life instead of just brushing over everything, which I liked. At the end of the author’s disclaimer section, she notes that she is “not saying it happened,” but she is saying that “it could have happened” which is a very important thing to keep in mind while reading this novel, because it is easy to believe that it is true due to our own understandings of the time period (Winthrop, 232). This book would be best suitable for young adult readers, probably for a student in middle or high school.

  • Kaley Robinson
    2019-03-07 20:00

    Counting on Grace was a somewhat difficult book to read. Once I stared to understand the point of view and the language, the book was enjoyable. The book starts out explaining how a family has to stop sending their children to school because they need more money to take care of their sick grandparents. Grace is only 12, but decides to work in the mills to help her parents save money to pay off the debt they owe to the store. Grace and her friend Arthur decided to write a letter to the Labor Board, telling them that underage children are working in the mills. Grace is used as a model for pictures, taken in the mill, and then her life changes forever. Arthur and Grace change how the mill will work forever.Purpose in the classroom:Read aloud:This book would be best used for a history lesson. This book shows the progress that was made against child labor laws in factories. Students could read this book and decide to find things they see wrong with their world and write a letter to some board to try and get it changed. Activities like this would get students reading, while also writing. The students would also be able to predict what would happen next. This book built up a lot of suspense, so students would be able to try and figure out who each new character was or what each characters next action would be. This book would be best for upper elementary since the words are more difficult and the content is somewhat more advanced. Literary elements: This book would be good to use with conflict. Grace often found herself in conflict and had to come up with a quick solution. Grace has to take care of her ill grandpa, while also trying to make money when she wasn't even old enough to work. Students would be able to give examples of different conflicts and be able to think of ways that Grace could have acted differently, or think that Grace did the right thing. Conflict was the biggest element in the book because of the child labor, so students would be able to figure out how to fix the conflict or understand that if there wasn't that problem, there would be no point of the book.

  • Suzi
    2019-02-22 18:05

    Historical Fact (NOT part of the story): In 1904, Lewis Hine traveled to Ellis Island to photograph immigrants streaming into America. He saw many children, and was horrified by the idea that they would be forced into child labor in order to help their families survive. In 1908, Hine took a job as staff photographer for the National Child Labor Committee and traveled throughout the country photographing child workers, taking notes to identify the children “whose health and education and futures had been sacrificed so that middle-class Americans could live their comfortable lives.”Years later, one particular photograph was shown in an exhibit of child labor photographs in northern New England. The little girl in the photograph was known only as ‘Addie’, and her eyes haunted those who looked at her picture. It is this very photograph that illustrates the cover of ‘Counting on Grace’, which was also printed on a 1998 U.S. Postal Service stamp commemorating child labor laws. Hine’s original glass-plate negative resides today in the Library of Congress.Elizabeth Winthrop, the author of ‘Counting on Grace’ saw the photograph at the Bennington Museum in Bennington, Vermont, and was inspired to write Addie’s story, renaming her Grace. After thoroughly researching the history of child labor in America, she created a very believable, heart-felt, fact-based story, told in the voice of 12-year-old Grace, a smart, thoughtful, and unforgettable little girl. It describes a time when poor, immigrant families were employed by mill-owners who did not pay fair wages and felt no shame exploiting young children to work in appalling and dangerous conditions. Winthrop skillfully tells Grace’s story with humor, charm, and integrity, and by focusing on the hope and strength of Grace, her family, her teacher, and Mr. Hines, is able to turn an awful situation into an uplifting and heartwarming read. I recommend this book to everyone who enjoys historical fiction … I began and finished the book in one sitting … it was that good.

  • Don LaFountaine
    2019-03-17 00:08

    I really enjoyed this book, not only because of the fact that it takes place in a small town in Vermont, where I live, but also because it tells a story about children having to work at the mills back in the early 20th century.This is a historical novel about a child named Grace. She is 12 years old, and knows that at some point she will be leaving to go to work in the mills. One day, the mill foreman comes and takes her best friend Arthur out of school to head to work. Before she knows it, she is escorted out of school by the teacher, and is working at the mill the next day. Her family needs her to work there because it will bring in extra money to help pay the bills to the mill owners, who are not only their landlords but also the owner of the local store and essentially in control of the town.As time passes, Grace and Arthur find themselves at the school with Miss Lesley, the teacher. In an attempt to get themselves out of the mill, and with the encouragement of Miss Lesley, they write a letter describing the conditions they work in as well as that there were underage children working there. From this starting point, Grace and Arthur find themselves back in school on Sunday's after church. Again, time passes and the children are getting frustrated with no response, when all of the sudden, Mr. Lewis Hine appears with his camera and begins to take pictures of the kids, as well as Grace by her machine.This book is written for younger readers; I would say about the same age group as"The Little House on the Prairie" books. It has some historical facts intermixed with a fictional story, (Lewis Hine was a real person who traveled throughout the country documenting these children) and is an quick read. Though intended for a younger audience, I think that adults will enjoy this book as well - especially if they read it with their children. I would highly recommend it to as a book for children to read, to people who enjoy historical fiction novels, and anyone who is intrigued by the era of when young children needed to work to help provide for the family.

  • Kate Schwarz
    2019-03-17 23:11

    I stumbled across this book when I was looking for a new audio book. I'm so glad I did--it was an exceptional piece of historical fiction for middle grade readers set in the early 1900s when childhood involved factories, serious responsibilities, and real consequences (not play, school, and huge chunks of device-filled free time like today). Because of the huge contrast to today's childhood, I think it is a great book for kids to read.Grace is nearly 12 when she is pulled from school and sent to work in a factory alongside her mother and sisters. She's pulled into a class taught on Sundays with a forward-thinking teacher and a classmate who wants nothing more than to leave the factory to go back to school. Grace straddles the line--she understands their point that children should not work, but she also sees her parents' real need for the extra money every week that Grace helps provide. Nevertheless, she is part of a letter that gets written to a local child labor investigator and an even bigger part of the resolution, which includes a visit from Lewis Hine, a (real-life) photographer of children who work in factories illegally.The book is such a wonderful insight into childhood 100 years ago--the Lewis Hine part was phenomenal not only because I loved learning about him in the book and in the book's wonderful, long, fact-filled author's note afterward, but because Grace sees herself for the first time. Her family doesn't own a mirror, so when Lewis Hine develops a picture of Grace and her friend Arthur in Grace's basement (when he boards with them after the factory visit, a historically accurate occurrence), Grace sees herself for the first time. In today's image-saturated environment, this moment was incredible and well-written and eye-opening.Highly recommend.

  • Tina Tallent
    2019-02-28 21:15

    I finally finished reading this historical fiction aloud to my 11-year-old daughter. I am very glad that we read it and very proud of her that she became interested in it despite the fact that it is the saddest book we have ever read together. Despite the harsh reality of life for poor children in 1910 that it describes very well, it has some happy moments as well and has a fairly pleasant ending. The last third of the book goes fast as the action and life changes increase for the characters. We stayed up late before my daughter left for a two-week trip to finish the last five chapters because we couldn't put it down.Besides teaching the reader about how child labor laws were started, this book teaches several important lessons.1. Sometimes individuals sacrifice enormous personal hardship in order to bring positive change to many people. They do this because they believe in the ability of a cause to bring good things and sometimes just because they know in their heart that it is right.2. Education is valuable.3. We should appreciate the fact that no matter how hard life may seem now, it was probably a lot worse for our ancestors 100 - 200 years ago as this nation was forming. We benefit from the hard work of those who came before us. What can we do to make the world better for those that live after us?4. Our American ancestors, those whose DNA make up who we are, had to be tough people - physically and emotionally. Most of them endured unimaginable hardships by today's standards. They were survivors. That means we can be survivors too.

  • Rachel Pederson
    2019-03-11 16:28

    Counting on Grace is a beautifully written book about the lives of textile mill workers of America in the early 1900’s. It follows the story of a little girl named Grace and her family through their struggles and challenges as poor workers of the south. When Grace and her friend Arthur are recruited to work in the mills like other children of the town, their teacher Miss Lesley is determined to help them and other children working in the mills to stay in school longer. Working with these children in personal Sunday school, she helps them write to the National Child Labor Committee to expose the factory of their unlawful hiring of children. The committee sends a photographer by the name of Lewis Hine to take their photographs, and write a report about the awful conditions these children are forced to work in. In the end, Arthur and Miss Lesley are forced to move away from the mill, and throughout all her hard work, Grace is hired on as the town’s schoolteacher, making a life for herself outside of the mill.This was a very good book for young readers who are interested in historical events. I would give this to students at about 4th grade or higher to introduce the lives of textile mill workers in the early 1900's. This book shows students how different life was over 100 years ago in the United States of America, and gives them an opportunity to create their own opinions and thoughts about their own lives in comparison to the lives of the characters in the story.

  • Lindsey
    2019-03-03 00:04

    Counting on Grace is written by Elizabeth Winthrow, and is about a little girl named Grace, who is forced to work at a textile mill at just fourteen years old, because her family is so poor. Grace has another friend who works in the mill with her, and her teacher does not think it is right that these young students have to work there. Their teacher writes a letter to the National Child Labor Committee, because it upsets her that children are working there, when they should be attending school full time. A photographer ends up coming and writes a report in the situation. He believes that it is unlawful for children to be dragged into the work force at such a young age. At the end of the story, Grace becomes the town’s school teacher because of all the hard work and determination that she brought attention to society. Some strengths of this story, is that it shows determination and how one can make a difference. Grace, her friends, and her teacher stood up for what is right, and therefore only good came out of it in the end. Some weaknesses of this story, is that it may bore children since it has to do with mill textile companies. This may come off as a turn-off for the unengaged readers. I can incorporate this book in my classroom, because I can teach how important it is to stand up for an important cause. Taking a stand can cause a huge difference in something, so I can have a class discussion on a time they felt like they needed to stand up for what was right.

  • Mallori Allphin
    2019-02-18 17:17

    Counting on Grace is written by Elizabeth Winthrow, and is about a little girl named Grace, who is forced to work at a textile mill at just fourteen years old, because her family is so poor. Grace has another friend who works in the mill with her, and her teacher does not think it is right that these young students have to work there. Their teacher writes a letter to the National Child Labor Committee, because it upsets her that children are working there, when they should be attending school full time. A photographer ends up coming and writes a report in the situation. He believes that it is unlawful for children to be dragged into the work force at such a young age. At the end of the story, Grace becomes the town’s school teacher because of all the hard work and determination that she brought attention to society. Some strengths of this story, is that it shows determination and how one can make a difference. Grace, her friends, and her teacher stood up for what is right, and therefore only good came out of it in the end. Some weaknesses of this story, is that it may bore children since it has to do with mill textile companies. This may come off as a turn-off for the unengaged readers. I can incoopropate this book in my classroom, because I can teach how important it is to stand up for an important cause. Taking a stand can cause a huge difference in something, so I can have a class discussion on a time they felt like they needed to stand up for what was right.

  • Thom Swennes
    2019-03-06 23:07

    “If I could tell the story in words, I wouldn’t have to lug around a camera”. This is a quote of Lewis Hine, a renowned photographer and reformer during the dawn of the twentieth century. Fifty years earlier the United States fought a war to end slavery in the South. Now it is in the North and not a voice is raised or a rifle shot in protest. That is until Lewis Hine and his camera came to town. Grace is a skinny twelve-year-old girl with a quick mouth and dancing feet. The largest employer in this Vermont border town of North Pownal along the Hoosic River and a stone’s throw from Massachusetts is a textile mill. The mill provides most of the jobs, most of the housing, most of the food and daily needs and has everyone so deeply indebted to them that leaving isn’t an option. The citizens of this peaceful community are as much enslaved as the most unfortunate Negros in the Deep South fifty years earlier. Labor Laws? Sure there were labor laws but these were poorly enforced and everything and everybody bowed to the mighty dollar. If a picture tells a thousand words then Lewis Hine has written an epic. The helplessness, hopelessness and destitute still call out to you one hundred years later. Social evolution is a slow and painful process and Elizabeth Winthrop has provided us with a bitter taste of it. The book is an eye opener to time past and thankfully never to return again. If you read it, you will like it.

  • Belinda
    2019-03-20 20:15

    I was drawn to this story because I practice labor law. This is the story of child labor in the early 1900’s in Vermont. The families work in a textile mill and live in mill housing and shop at mill stores. The children are pulled from school and sent to work in the mill, no later than twelve, even though they cannot get valid work permits until they are fourteen. This happens because every available body is necessary to keep the mills running and the parent caught up on their debts to the mill. Most of the children and adults in the mill are illiterate. Grace, one of the better students, leaves school and enters the mill because she has no hopes for anything better. However, she soon learns that, because she is left-handed, the work is more difficult that she could ever have anticipated. When she discovers that the sympathetic teacher is tutoring her friend Arthur on Sundays, she demands to participate and helps write an anonymous letter to the Child Labor Board reporting the abuses in the mill. Eventually, an undercover investigator comes and photographs the children in the mill and prepares a report on the issue. The investigator is based on a real person, who traveled the country photographing the child labor abuses of that era. One of his actual photographs is on the cover of the book. Unfortunately, his fictional intervention comes too late for Arthur and the teacher, but opens new avenues for Grace.

  • Monique
    2019-03-12 23:07

    I was not expecting this. I was not expecting this book to transport me to a time when children had to work or the family could starve, or even kicked out of their own home. I was not expecting to actually care about these questions, as flawed as they are. I was not expecting to be blown away.As I was saying, I was caught up in the whirl of things, the slow but sure changes, the character development was amazing. Not just with the main character, but with all the main people in this book. But what did confuse me was what Ms. Lesley(See, I don't memorize names unless it was a good book!) said to Grace, about Arthur. So was it wrong to encourage Arthur as Ms. Lesley did?And the ending! This might be one of the few endings that I am actually happy about! Sure, it didn't give much of what was going to happen, but you can piece it together with today. Till at least 16, youths can't even get a job, so it would make sense, that would be the kind of limit to your education, although 18 is very recommended (with a diploma). Kids under are kinda required to go to school. But knowing the end of Grace's story isn't all that important. Besides the end, her story mirrors many others at that time in history.Kudos for the amazing description of getting your picture taken!